Tutorials




Simple Super Search with Base Map Change

In this video you will learn how to use the default layer, list search results in descending order and the show more button, use search results that contain the word entered as a part of the result, change the basemap layer, and clear the display. Watch the Video More Details


Map Display and Symbols

In this video you will learn how to search all wells, use formation and productivity symbols, and display labels.
Watch the Video More Details


Heat Maps

In this video you will learn how to search all wells, choose heat map parameters and grids, create custom heat maps and save them as a template, and retrieve a custom heat map template and apply it to a different search.
Watch the Video More Details


Multiple Layers Search

In this video you will learn how to search several layers simultaneously, use the layer filter text box, quickly remove a layer from the search, leverage the power of column names in your data, and rearrange layers, turn them on and off, and locate from the Active Layers box.
Watch the Video More Details


Bar Charts and Histograms

In this video you will learn how to select chart type, select attributes, sorting method, hole direction, and chart options, click on any bar to show a subsearch, full screen/split screen and undo subsearch, toggle linear and log scale, move the statistics legend, and move the chart window around the screen.
Watch the Video More Details


Refine Search

In this video you will learn how to use the Refine tool to show results by a particular column and further refine the result by operator.
Watch the Video More Details


Saving a Search or View

In this video you will learn how to save a complex search to the recent searches folder, save a heat map view to a workbook, retrieve a saved view in the display tab, and retrieve a saved search in the Recent Searches folder.
Watch the Video More Details


Advanced Search with AOI

In this video you will learn how to create an area of interest, add and remove terms in Advanced Search, and change date range.
Watch the Video More Details


Creating Teams, Workbooks, and Folders

In this video you will learn how to create a new team, create a new workbook, add folders and layers to a workbook, and give teams access to a workbook.
Watch the Video More Details


Bubble Maps

In this video you will learn how to view custom bubble maps, save custom bubble maps, and retrieve saved bubble maps.
Watch the Video More Details


Creating a Linked Layer

In this video you will learn how to upload .csv files, edit .csv files, and link .csv files.
Watch the Video More Details


Using Annotation Tools to Create a Pad Plan

In this video you will learn how to create an annotation, edit an annotation, and save and retrieve an annotation.
Watch the Video More Details


Uploading a Shapefile

In this video you will learn how to select searchable, columns in a shapefile, set symbology styles for a shapefile, and create new display names.
Watch the Video More Details


Custom Bar Chart

In this video you will learn how to select number of bars, columns, summarize method, click on any bar to show a sub search, and save a template and reuse on a different search.
Watch the Video More Details


Uploading and Styling a Layer

In this video you will learn how to select searchable columns, set symbology names, and create new display names.
Watch the Video More Details


Working with Layers

In this video you will learn how to view a layer, search layers, analyze layers, delete, rename, copy and move layers, select or edit layer styles, set default search layer, rearrange layers, turn on and off, and locate from the Active Layers (L) window.
Watch the Video More Details

X

Simple Super Search

X

Simple Super Search

This video explains how to use Super Search to quickly search the default data layer.
In this example, the default data layer is IHS Well Data Latest.
First, type a search term in the box; for example, weld. Press the enter key or click the search
icon.
In the results panel, we see that County returns the greatest number of matches for the word
Weld. The results for the word Weld are listed in descending order by number of results
found. County returned the most results, followed by Current Operator and Operator. Click
on Show more to see more results.
Select Current Operator. Click locate to find the wells. The wells are white and difficult to see
against the white map so let’s change the base map. Click on the B above the scroll bar at the
right of the map and select Esri World Imagery. Now select a well marker to see that weld is
indeed a part of the Current Operator name.
Clear the Display by clicking the Clear icon at the bottom of the User Interface window.
Now let’s do a search for con. The result with the greatest number of matches is County with
more than 1500 wells with con in the county name (for example, Converse, Conway, etc).
Click Show More to the see all the results. The result with the fewest matches is Formation.
Select this result and click locate. Select any well marker to see that con is part of a formation
name. Note that all columns with the word formation in them are joined together for the
purposes of the results panel. For example in Texas, this well has Conglomerate Lower listed
for projected formation and up here in Kansas, this well has Conglomerate listed for IP
Production Formation Name.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Map Display and Symbols

X

Map Display and Symbols

This video explains the map symbology and how to change the map display.
Let’s load all the wells in the IHS dataset. Notice that we have IHS Well Data Latest selected in
the search layer box. Simply click the search icon leaving the search box blank. This returns all
the wells in the IHS data layer for the past year. The default well symbols are color coded by
formation.
Click the legend button to see which colors represent which formations. Well Activity is
designated by shapes and outlines.
Horizontal wells are designated by rectangles. Vertical and Directional wells are designated by
circles. Wells with a colored outline and white center indicate permitted wells. Solid shapes
indicate spudded wells and wells outlined in black indicate producing wells.
Click hide to remove the legend from view.
Now scroll down to the Analysis Panel. Notice that the IHS Well Data is listed here as the data
layer to analyze. If other layers have been loaded, they are selectable here. Within the
Analysis Panel, scroll down and select Map Display, then Symbols. Change it from Formation
to Productivity.
Open the legend to see which colors represent the highest producing wells.
PetroDE allows you to turn on labels for the data layer. Click on Labels under Map Display and
open the drop-down menu. The options available come from the columns in the data layer
being analyzed. For example, click Hole Direction.
The last option under Map Display is Heat Maps. PetroDE uses heat maps to allow users to
isolate certain attributes and display them using selectable grids. For help using the Heat Map
tools, refer to the Heat Maps video.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Heat Maps

X

Heat Maps

This tutorial explains how to use the Heat Map tool in PetroDE.
Let’s load all the wells in the IHS dataset. Simply click the search icon leaving the search box blank. This returns all the wells in the data layer selected for the time span listed here in the date range selector box. The default well symbols are color coded by formation.
To view as a heat map, scroll down to the Analysis Panel. Select Map Display, then Heat Maps. The various options for heat maps are listed here. Let’s look at an IP heat map. Set the grid to counties and the parameter to Upper Perf Depth. Click the Display button. Now you can see the average IP heat maps for the Upper Perforation Depths by county.
We can easily create a custom Heat Map by selecting the Custom option. First choose the grid size. We will choose a 6-mile grid. Then choose the data type to be either text String or Number. Let’s illustrate the String data type first. Select Formation for the Column. Next, select the color bar by clicking the drop-down menu next to the color bar. Select from the preset color bars and then select Custom to further customize your color bar. You can add colors by clicking on the + symbol and remove colors by clicking and dragging them off the pallet. Click the Display button. Notice that Nyobraira is the top formation for this map. Let’s limit our area of interest to a section in Texas. Note that the legend has updated to reflect the top 7 formations in this smaller area of interest. To view these 7 formations through time, click Lock Legend and then change the time period to say 2013 to compare the heat maps for the same 7 formations.
Now, let’s change the data type to Number and set the column to TVD. Under Summarize by, choose how to aggregate the data in each block. For this example, choose Max (which in this case means areas of deepest drilling). Next, select the color bar. Then select the scale to be either log or linear. We will choose log scale. Choose the bounds as either Percentile or Value. We will choose Percentile between 10 and 90 percent. Click the Display button.
Let’s save this heat map as a template for Max TVD for all of the IHS Data. Remove the area of interest by clicking on the eraser in the AOI tools. Go back to the custom panel and click the Save button. Type in a name (Max TVD Template) . It will be available to view later in the Saved section under Heat Maps. The saved “template” can be used with other search criteria if desired. To illustrate, clear the display by clicking the clear display button in the lower tool bar. Then type Bakken in the search box. Click on locate to zoom into this data layer. Now go down to Map Display and select Heat Maps. Select Saved and select Max TVD Template. This illustrates the application of a saved heat map template to a different search criteria – the Bakken.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Multiple Layers Search

X

Multiple Layers Search

This video explains how to search multiple data layers.
Begin by choosing the layers you would like to search. Open the Layer Selection drop-down
and enter all or part of the name you are looking for in the Filter Layers search box. For
example, we want to look at data relating to basins.
Matches will begin appearing as soon as you start typing. Tick the box next to the layer you
wish to add. Let’s select US Basins. We also want to see geo news so type that next. Now,
let’s add Rig Data. Select US Drilling and US Permits. Layers can be removed from the list by
unchecking the box or by clicking on the red x at the right. Notice that the layer selection box
now lists the number of active layers. We can now minimize the Layer Selection box.
Let’s do a search. Type Anadarko followed by the Enter key in the search box. In the results
panel we see that Basin returns the greatest number of matches for the word Anadarko. The
results for the word Anadarko are listed in descending order by number of results found.
Basin returned the most results, followed by Operator, Current Operator, etc. Click on Show
More to see more results. Let’s go back to the primary result, Basin. IHS Well Data layer has
the greatest number of matches for Basin. The GeoNews layer and the US basins layer also
returned results. The default automatically displays the IHS Well Data layer since it has the
most results. Select GeoNews and US Basins to display those results and notice the different
icons. If we click on locate, the map zooms in or out to show that data layer. Click on locate
for GeoNews. We see a result for London. Click on locate for IHS Well Data.
We have a high density of wells here when all three layers are turned on. Click on a well to see
the Description Bubble. The layer for the well bubble currently shown is in parentheses. Click
the drop-down so see information from all the layers. The data is differentiated by their
unique icons as well as the layer name in parenthesis. Click on a well to see its bubble details.
The active data layers can be organized by clicking the Active Layers “L” icon next to the zoom
scroll bar. This opens the Active Layers window. Clicking on the pin leaves this window open,
and clicking the X in the corner closes the window. You can change the order in which the
layers are displayed by clicking and dragging the layers. Let’s move the US Basins layer to the
back by dragging it to the bottom of the list. You can toggle a layer on and off by ticking the
box to the left. A layer is removed from memory by clicking the red X on the right. Let’s
remove GeoNews. The green boxes indicate that all the data is loaded for that layer (vs. an
orange box for a partial load). The target icon is used to locate the layer.
If we go back to the results panel, we can look at the secondary results for Anadarko. Click
Operator to see its results. It returned results from IHS Well Data, RigData US Permits,
GeoNews, and RigData US Drilling. These layers can each be toggled on and off and located
either from the results panel or in the active layers window. If you want to rearrange the
order of the layers or remove a layer from current memory, you need to open the Active
Layers window. This concludes this tutorial.

X

Bar Charts and Histograms

X

Bar Charts and Histograms

This video explains how to use the bar chart and histogram tools in PetroDE.
Let’s look at the Permian basin in the IHS Wells data layer. We have the Demo IHS Wells layer
selected to search. Type Permian in the search box. Click locate to zoom into the search
result. Scroll down to the Analysis Panel and select Charts, then Bar Charts.
The options available are IP, Treatment, Peak 30, 60 and 90, Saved and Custom. Custom
charts are useful for creating templates for repeated use. These templates can be saved and
later found under Saved. This is further explained in the custom charts video.
Select IP. Select the type to be Top Operator. Select the desired attribute, which come from
the columns in the search layer. We will look at Gas. Next select the sorting method to be
either performance or well count. Let’s look at performance. Notice that as we make
changes, the chart updates immediately. If you don’t want the chart to update until you are
finished entering all the criteria, do not click the radio button to select the type of chart, select
the down arrow instead and then click on Display once the criteria is entered.
We also have Chart Options. For bar charts, you can opt to hide the grid lines.
The bar chart appears in a split screen with the map. To see a larger view of the bar chart,
select the + symbol at the top right of the window. Select the minus symbol to return to a
split screen. If you click on any bar, a subsearch is created with only those wells displayed on
the map. You can see the full search again by clicking Undo Subsearch.
You can hide the chart criteria window by clicking the double back arrows. Click the gear
symbol to get it back again.
Now let’s look at histograms. Minimize Bar Charts and select Histograms. Let’s look at Peak
30. Set the type to Liquid and the Hole Direction to Vertical Wells. Now click on Chart
Options. This allows you to hide the grid lines, set the number of bins and the minimum and
maximum values. These changes will appear when you click Save Changes. You can also
toggle the histogram between log and linear scale by clicking either Log or Linear at the top of
the window. You can move the statistics window within the histogram. You can also turn it
off and on by toggling Statistics at the top of the window.
We can move the entire chart around on the screen and if you move it all the way to the right,
it will append it to the right side of your screen. This is a handy feature if you are working with
two screens. I can only show one screen here, but you get the idea.
This concludes this tutorial. boxes indicate that all the data is loaded for that layer (vs. an
orange box for a partial load). The target icon is used to locate the layer.
If we go back to the results panel, we can look at the secondary results for Anadarko. Click
Operator to see its results. It returned results from IHS Well Data, RigData US Permits,
GeoNews, and RigData US Drilling. These layers can each be toggled on and off and located
either from the results panel or in the active layers window. If you want to rearrange the
order of the layers or remove a layer from current memory, you need to open the Active
Layers window. This concludes this tutorial.

X

Refine Search

X

Refine Search

This tutorial explains how to use the Refine tool in PetroDE.
In this example, the data layer being searched is IHS Well Data.
Let’s search the Bakken formation so type Bakken in the search box.
Now let’s further refine this search using the Refine Tool. Scroll down to the Analysis panel and
select Refine. The fields available will appear.
Fields with number values have a slider bar. This allows for easy refinement by any number
available. As you slide the bar, the map adjusts automatically. Note that null values can be
included by ticking include null values.
Let’s look at wells with an IP oil above 900. Select IP Oil from the list and enter 900 in the first
field or slide the bar to 900. The map is updated automatically. The result can be further refined
by clicking on any of the other available fields. For example, select Operator to refine by one or
more of the Operators of these wells. We will select EOG Resources and Whiting. The map is
updated automatically to include only these operators.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Saving a Search or View

X

Saving a Search or View

This tutorial explains how to save a search or view in PetroDE.
In this example, the data layer being searched is IHS Well Data.
Note that a search can be saved in two places, either the Recent Searches folder or in a
Workbook. Searches saved in the Recent Searches folder located under the Open tab can only
be viewed by you. Searches saved in a Workbook via the Views icon can be seen by anyone
with access to the Workbook. A view including an Analysis such as a heat map and/or Refined
results may only be saved to a workbook or folder using the Views icon.
Let’s do a complex search. Enter Bakken in the search box, then select the Advanced tab.
Click the drop-down list for the available fields and select Operator. Keep starts and ends with
(s/e) as the operator and enter Continental in the search box. Click Add Term and select
County from the list of fields. Keep the starts and ends with and enter Williams in the search
box. Click the Search button. To save a search result to your recent searches folder, click
the Open drop-down arrow in the Search Panel and select Save. Enter a name, Bakken
Continental in Williams Cty. This will save to your Saved folder under the Open tab and can
only be viewed by you. You can also save this search in a workbook, which we will illustrate after
a few more steps.
Let’s do some analysis. Remove Williams County from the search criteria so that we have more
wells to work with. Scroll down to the Analysis Panel and select Map Display then Heat Maps.
Click the drop-down arrow next to IP and select 6-mile grid and Boevd21. Click Display. To
save this view to a workbook, click the Views icon on the bottom toolbar. Click Save View. Select
the desired destination or add a new folder. We will select the Bakken workbook. Enter the
name of your view, Continental Heat Map and click the Save button. Now clear the display by
clicking the Clear icon so we can illustrate the retrieval of saved views and searches.
Click the Display tab. Select the workbook where you saved the heat map view, i.e., Bakken.
Click on Continental Heat Map. Now let’s see our view from Williams County in the first
example. Clear the display again. Go back to the Search tab. Click the Open drop-down and
select Bakken Continental in Williams Cty to see the saved search from the first example.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Advanced Search with AOI

X

Advanced Search with AOI

This video explains how to use Advanced Search to find wells in a specific area of interest with
a perforated length between 5000 and 7000 feet. It also explains how to search for wells with
an IP greater than 100 barrels of oil equivalent on a value basis with a ratio of 21 (BOEVD21).
In this example, the data layer being searched is IHS Well Data.
Create an Area of Interest by selecting the rectangle tool in the Area of Interest toolbox and click
and drag to select the desired area. We want to look at an area on the Utah Colorado border.
Select Advanced under the Search tab. Click the drop-down list for the available fields and
select Perforation Length. Select the operator to be > and enter 5000 in the search box.
Click Add Term and ensure Perforation Length is still selected. Select the operator to be < and enter 7000 in the search box. In the date range selector box, change Past Year to Past 5 years. Click the Search button. This returns wells with a perforated length between 5000 and 7000 for the desired area of interest over that past 5 years. Now let's look for wells with significant IP. Click Add Term and select IP Boevd21 from the dropdown list. Select > for the operator and 100 for the value. Click the Search button. This returns
wells that match the search criteria. To see only the results for IP Boevd21 > 100, remove the
two Perforation Length terms by clicking the red x next to those terms. Click the search button to
view the result.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Creating Teams, Workbooks, and Folders

X

Creating Teams, Workbooks, and Folders

This video explains how to create teams and workbooks in PetroDE.
The Emperor Tamarin version of PetroDE organizes your data using workbooks, which are
listed under the Display tab. Access to workbooks is controlled by an administrator, who can
place users on teams and then give teams access to workbooks. If a user or a team does not
have access to a workbook, it will not show up on their screen.
Workbooks can be set up in whatever way best meets your company’s needs. For example,
the New Ventures team can have a New Ventures workbook that holds all their data and
interpretations, as well as a workbook for Land and Operations. Layers such as the nationwide
IHS wells and production can be shared in various workbooks, while the layer that holds
current leaseholds can be set up to be visible only in the Land and Operations workbook.
To create a new team, click the Admin icon located on the bottom toolbar, then select Teams
and click the Create Team button. Let’s call our new team Acquisitions. To add users, simply
click on the new team name and select uses from the list available on the right.
To create a new workbook, select Workbooks from the Manage panel. Click the Create
Workbook button in the pop-up window. Let’s add one called Boundaries. If folders are
desired, click Add Folder. Folders can be added at anytime. 
To add layers already loaded into PetroDE to the workbook, click the Add Layer drop-down list
to see the available layers. Select Federal and Indian Lands.
Note that updates to shared layers are instantly visible in any workbook that contains the
layer. 
To give access to teams, select them from the list on the right side of the window under Teams
without Access. Let’s select the Acquisitions team we just created.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Bubble Maps

X

Bubble Maps

This video explains how to view the search result as a bubble map with graduated symbols.
To begin, we’ll do a search on the Bakken. Click locate to zoom into the layer. Now go to
the Analysis panel and click on Map Display and then Bubble Maps. The options available are
None, Saved, and Custom. To create a new bubble map, click on the drop-down for
Custom and select the field you wish to view. We will select IP Boevd21. Now select
either Ascending or Descending by clicking on the word or using the slider bar. Ascending
shows the largest bubble with the largest value. Descending shows the largest bubble with
the smallest value. We will select Ascending. To show the labels, tick Show Value as Label.
Click Display.
Values are proportional to the radius of the bubble. For areas with multiple bubbles, only the
value for the largest bubble is shown. When you zoom in, you can see the underlying values.
You may also click on a high density area and click the drop-down on the pop-up balloon to
see the underlying wells.
To save the bubble map for later use, click the Save button in the custom panel. We will name
it IPBoevd21 with labels.
Now to better illustrate the saved bubble map, let’s click on None to return the display to
formation symbols. Clear the display. Now enter Eagle Ford in the search box. Scroll down to
the Analysis panel, select Map Display then Bubble Maps and select Saved. Tick the map we
just created, IPBoevd21 with labels. It will quickly show IPBoevd21 values for the Eagle Ford
in ascending order.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Creating a Linked Layer

X

Creating a Linked Layer

This video explains how to upload new layers and create a Linked Layer in the Create Layer
wizard. Shapefiles and/or CSV files can be linked if they share a common column. At least one
of the layers must have geographic properties such as lat and lon.
We are going to link two Permian Basin csv files. Let’s have a look at them before we begin
the upload. Things to consider:
 Which columns in your file should be included (searchable)
 Which columns should appear in the pop-up balloon
 Which column should the style properties be based on. Only one column can be used for
the style properties.
 Look at the data and if any columns that will be included contain more than one type of
data (e.g., number and text), edit the data to be the desired type only. For example – a
file contains a column for IP FCP that contains the pressure number plus the units (e.g.
1200 PSIG). Edit the column so that the units appears in the column header and only
the number remains in the data. Make sure to save the file as a .csv.

Now we are ready to upload the data files:
1. Go to the Create tab and select Create Layer.
2. Choose the file and workbook location and layer name.
3. Follow the Create Layer Wizard, selecting the appropriate columns to search and
display. If any data conflicts occur, the data file may need to be edited to resolve.

Once the data layers you wish to link have been uploaded to PetroDE:
1. Ensure both layers have been uploaded to PetroDE and know their file names.
2. Select the Create tab, then select Create Linked Layer.
3. Enter the file names of the layers just uploaded into the two columns.
4. Follow the Create Linked Layer Wizard.

X

Using Annotation Tools to Create a Pad Plan

X

Using Annotation Tools to Create a Pad Plan

This video explains how to use the annotation tools to draw a pad plan. First zoom into the
area of the map where you wish to create a pad plan. We will want to be able to see the
satellite imagery, so set the basemap to Esri World Imagery by clicking the B above the slider
bar on the right side of the map. Zoom in far enough to see the existing structures.
Go to the Create tab and select Create Annotation. Enter the name for the annotation layer
and select the workbook where you wish to save it. Click the Save as New File button.
Our plan requires a buffer distance of 500 feet from any existing structure. We can easily
show this restriction by using the circle tool with a specific dimension. Scroll down to
dimensions and enter 500 for the radius and leave the units in feet. Select the desired colors
and opacity. Click on any buildings in the pad plan area to place the circle.
Now we are ready to draw a pad. We want our pad to be 500 by 600 feet with an angle of 20
degrees. Select the Rect. tool with specific dimensions. Scroll down to dimensions and enter
500 for the width, 600 for the height, and 20 degrees for the angle. Leave the units in feet.
Select the desired colors and opacity. Click on the map where you want the pad centered. If
you want your pad at a specific latitude and longitude, enter them in the latitude and
longitude boxes and click the Add Rectangle button. This centers the rectangle on that axis
point.
To add a road to our pad plan, select the Line tool. Select the desired color and line width for
your road. If you have a desired length, you can specify it under Specify Dimensions. Click the
mouse once at the starting point for your road and double click the mouse at the end point.
To add a label to the annotation, select the Text tool. Enter the name of the pad in the text
field. Select the desired text color and size and click the location where you want to center the
label. Click Save to save changes.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Uploading a Shapefile

X

Uploading a Shapefile

This video explains how to upload a shapefile and set its styles in PetroDE.
Shapefiles, CSV files and KML/KMZ files can be uploaded in either the Display
tab (under a folder), or the Create tab. Click the Create Layer button in either
location, which brings up the Create Layer Wizard. Before uploading a shapefile,
you will need to know what columns in your file should be included (searchable),
and what data you want to appear in the pop-up bubble. Only one column can be
used for the style properties. Note that shapefiles must be uploaded using a
zipped folder file (.zip) containing the .shp, .shx, .prj and .dbf files. The first
window in the Create Layer Wizard is the Select File to Upload window. Click
the Choose File button to begin uploading your zipped shapefile folder, or drag
and drop your file on top of the upload button until it changes hue. Then select
the workbook you want the layer to appear in. Choose a layer name if different
from the file name automatically generated. Click Next.
Now the Indicate Presence window appears. Select the columns you want
included. Columns not selected will be neither stored nor accessible in the
PetroDE system.
Next, Specify Columns: Look at the Display Name column and change the
name if needed. These names are what will appear in the selectable fields and
the popup bubble. Any Display Name with a green Create button next to it needs
to have a name and data type created. Data types can be either Text, Number,
or Date. Click the Create button when finished. Make sure the column type
associated with each display name is correct. If it is not correct, change the
display name and the data type will automatically generate based on the data.
Indicate Columns to be Used When Searching: Columns selected will be used
when searching a layer. Columns not selected can still be included in the
bubbles, charts, heat maps, labels and exports.
Indicate Bubble Contents: Select the columns that will appear in the bubbles,
which appear when you click on a polygon or point marker that is displayed on
the map.
Indicate Bubble Name Column: Select the identifying column that will be
displayed in the dropdown list in a bubble in areas with multiple overposted wells.
Select Style Column: Select the column that is represented by the well symbol.
Input Layer Style: The values for the column appear in the window on the right.
In this example, we will classify in increments of 400 so we will select between 0
and 400 for the first value. Next select the transparency and color and click the
New Style button for the next value, which is between 400 and 800. The New
Styles will appear on the left side of the screen. Click the Finish button when
done.
Confirm Style Rules: Verify the styles you created are correct and either edit or
delete styles that are not correct. Click Finish when you are happy with the
styles you created.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Custom Bar Chart

X

Custom Bar Chart

This video explains how to create a custom bar chart template to compare the average IP
Boevd21 for each field and how many wells are used to calculate the average.
Let’s look at the Bakken in the IHS Wells data layer. Type Bakken in the search box. Click
locate to zoom into the search result. Scroll down to the Analysis Panel and select Charts,
then Bar Charts. Select Custom and fill in the options, starting with number of desired bars.
We will limit the number of bars to 10.
Choose the column for the X Axis. Available fields from the searched data will appear in the
drop-down list in alphabetical order. Select Field.
Choose the column for the Y Axis. You may have two y axes (Y and Y2). If both Y and Y2 are
used, two bars will appear for each x-axis point. Select IP Boevd21.
Choose how to summarize the data:
 None – doesn’t summarize by a group, gives results for individual data.
 Average – the average of the Y-axis data sorted by the result of the aggregate.
 Sum – the sum of the Y-axis data sorted by the result of the aggregate.
 Count – the number of wells used in the aggregate.
 Min – Minimum Y-axis data sorted by the result of the aggregate.
 Max – Maximum Y-axis data sorted by the result of the aggregate.
We want to see which fields have the highest average ratio so we will select Average.
Choose the column for the Y2 Axis, if desired. If only one bar per x-axis point is desired, select
None. We will select IP Boevd21 and summarize by Count so we can see how many wells
were used in the calculation. Notice that the scales are different for the two Y axes.
If you click on any bar, a subsearch is created with only those wells displayed on the map. You
can see the full search again by clicking Undo Subsearch. Hover over the red bar to see the
exact average value and hover over the corresponding blue bar to see how many wells were
used in the calculation.
To save a custom bar chart as a template, click the Save button. Name it AVG IP Boevd21 by
Field.
Close the chart. Now let’s do another search on the Denver basin. Go to Bar Charts again and
select Saved. Click on the AVG IP Boevd21 by Field template that we just saved. Nice and easy
to do the same comparison without having to re-enter the criteria.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Uploading and Styling a Layer

X

Uploading and Styling a Layer

This video explains how to upload a layer and set its styles in PetroDE.
Shapefiles, CSV files and KML/KMZ files can be uploaded in either the Create tab, or
the Display tab (under a folder). Click the Create Layer button in either location, which
brings up the Create Layer Wizard. Before uploading a layer, you will need to know
what columns in your file should be included (searchable), and what data you want to
appear in the pop-up bubble. Note that shapefiles must be uploaded as a zipped folder
file (.zip) containing the .shp, .shx, .prj and .dbf files. The first window in the Create
Layer Wizard is the Select File to Upload window. Click the Choose File button, or
drag and drop your file on top of the Choose File button until it changes hue. Then
select the workbook you want the layer to appear in. Choose a layer name if different
from the file name automatically generated. Click Next.
Now the Indicate Presence window appears. Select the columns you want included.
Columns not selected will be neither stored nor accessible in the PetroDE system.
Next, Specify Columns: Look at the Display Name column and change the name if
needed. These names are what will appear in the selectable fields and the popup
bubble. Any Display Name with a green Create button next to it needs to have a name
and data type created. Data types can be either Text, Number, or Date. Click
the Create button when finished. Make sure the column type associated with each
display name is correct. If it is not correct, change the display name and the data type
will automatically generate based on the data.
Indicate Columns to be Used When Searching: Columns selected will be used when
searching a layer. Columns not selected can still be included in the bubbles, charts,
heat maps, labels and exports.
Indicate Bubble Contents: Select the columns that will appear in the bubbles, which
appear when you click on a polygon or point marker that is displayed on the map.
Indicate Bubble Name Column: Select the identifying column that will be displayed in
the dropdown list in a bubble in areas with multiple overposted wells. Click Next and
the layer will be generated.
Editing Styles: For a new layer, select the Create New Style Group button.
Creating Style Group: Select the first column that you wish to create a style group for
and select the Set Column button. Multiple columns can be styled. The window with
the default style will appear. If you want to edit the default style, which appears for null
values, select Edit. To add a new style, click Add Style. The data range for the
column appears in the window on the right. You can classify values with different
colors. Styles can be set to be either equal to a certain value or between two values.
Click Add Style from the left side of the screen until you have finished adding styles for
values in this column. When finished, click the Save and Finish button. This will bring
you back to the Editing Styles window. To add another style group, select the Create
New Style Group
button. Create the new style group and click Save and Finish
when complete. If more than one style has been created, select the default style on
the Editing Styles window. Select Finished when the desired style groups have
been completed.
The new data layer will be displayed on the map. To search the data layer, clear the
screen and then select the layer from the search tab.
Scroll down to the Analysis panel and select Map Display then Symbols to see the
list of new style groups just created.
This concludes this tutorial.

X

Working With Layers

X

Working With Layers

This tutorial explains how to view, search, analyze, delete, rename, copy and move layers. It
also explains how to use the Active Layers (L) window.
Let’s choose a layer to view. We can do this two ways. Either from the Search tab or from the
Display tab. From the Display tab, enter all or part of the name you are looking for in the Filter
Layers search box. For example, we want to look at data from Rig Data. Matches will begin
appearing as soon as you start typing. Tick the box next to the layer you wish to add. Since we
are selecting this layer from the Display tab, the layer is not yet searchable. To make it
searchable, click the drop-down menu and select Analyze Layer. This brings us to the Search
tab. I am also interested in searching a couple more layers. I will go ahead and enter them
here in the Search tab. I am interested in Basin Intel Lease Activity and Primary Vision. Notice
the layer selection box now lists 3 active layers. Click on the search icon to search all layers.
The active data layers can be viewed and re-arranged by clicking the Active Layers ‘L’ icon
next to the zoom scroll bar. This opens the Active Layers window. Clicking on the pin leaves
this window open, and clicking the X in the corner closes the window. You can change the
order in which the layers are displayed by clicking and dragging the layers. You can toggle a
layer on and off by ticking the box to the left. A layer is removed from memory by clicking the
red X on the right. The green boxes indicate that all the data is loaded for that layer (vs. an
orange box for a partial load). The target icon is used to locate the layer.
You can further refine any of these searches by going to the Analysis panel, selecting the
desired layer from the drop-down list, and selecting Refine. Let’s refine the Rig Data layer to
look at Permit Dates. Let’s look at the last 2 months. Next, let’s refine the Primary Vision layerto look at a particular Operator. We will select Apache.
Now let’s go to the Display tab and look at the options available on the layer drop-down menu.
We can delete, rename, copy , edit styles, select styles, set layer as the default search layer,
get an upload manifest (to set up an automatic update for a layer that you own), download a
layer as a shapefile or csv, analyze the layer, look at the layer properties, or locate the layer.